Solid State Devices laboratory

CEER 112 Dr. Singh / Dr. Mark Jupina


The Solid State Devices Laboratory is a facility used to support advanced undergraduate, graduate, and faculty research in the areas of materials and device fabrication and characterization and battery characterization and modeling. Research that is currently supported by this laboratory include the development of a smart battery controller for tank batteries, portable defibrillator characterization and modeling, development of a charge controller for micro-batteries, and the characterization of novel, high frequency semiconductor device structures.

About one half of the facility supports class 1000 modular clean room units including spin coater, mask aligner/exposure unit, oxidation/diffusion furnaces, and rinse/developer units. The other half of the facility houses semiconductor device and battery characterization equipment. An electrodeposition unit, a thermal evaporator unit, and a 1300 oC tube furnace are available for the fabrication of thin film solar cells. For the characterization of semiconductor materials and devices, two probe stations are available for DC through microwave frequency characterization. An optical bench is available for making photoconductivity and spectral response measurements. And other instruments, such as a spectrum analyzer, a network analyzer, impedance analyzers, DC source/monitor units, a phase noise measurement system, and a noise figure meter are also available for device characterization.

Two Solartron 1280B Electrochemical System Impedance measurement units, electronic loads, Motorola 68HC11 and 68HC12 microcontroller development systems, and a Tenney TU-Jr oven support the battery characterization research conducted in the lab.

The clean room will be used to train advanced undergraduate and graduate students in the fabrication of microelectronic devices including discrete devices and thin film integrated circuits. It will also provide a service facility to the antenna research group for fabricating thin film antennas on dielectric substrates.